Bourbon Baroque’s Dido and Aeneas

Bourbon Baroque

Louisville’s period instrument ensemble Bourbon Baroque will be presenting Henry Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas at the Kentucky Center’s Bomhard Theater on Saturday, March 14 at 8:00pm.

Co-artistic directors of Bourbon Baroque, Austin Clark and Nicolas Fortin sat down with Daniel Gilliam to discuss their upcoming production.

How this production of Dido and Aeneas is different from the rest

“This production of Dido and Aeneas is the quintessential example of what our mission is for Bourbon Baroque. We have gathered together a group of a variety of disciplines to create a visual concept for this production that includes contemporary dance, pantomime actors on mask, as well as of course the orchestra, the chorus, and minimalist costume and scenic design.”

How Bourbon Baroque puts on an opera without being an opera company

“I am a big fan of surrounding yourself with smarter people. I think it makes it so that you don’t feel like you have everything on your shoulders. Obviously with the opera form that is a whole contingency of collaboration…. Through my own personal musical work and musical theater direction, I have met many people in the theater community and through those projects and introductions I have formulated this wonderful Baroque dream team, a local group that is going to help us make this happen.”

On Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas

“It is based on the Aeneid by Virgil and retells the story of the sad and unfortunate fate of Dido getting betrayed by her lover Aeneas… It’s beautiful music, very intricate fast paced one hour opera with dance music. The characters are making the story in front our eyes, but always with short and compelling interjections of 24 piece chorus in our production.”

On working with the Youth Performing Arts School

“This program is great for us because the YPAS students are able to dedicate the time needed to make the music really speak. When I’m coaching young musicians, particularly singers, I’m like, well it’s one thing to learn the notes but it’s quite another to then add on that extra layer, all the gestures and the Baroque styling, which I am often equating to musical theater. Musical theater has their own little bitty ways of doing things and if you can understand that then you can understand that the Baroque music has it’s own toolbox of vocal techniques that makes things really sell.”

On the short orchestral suite to begin the evening

“There is a short 20 minuet orchestral suite that we’ve actually performed a handful of times before. It’a a piece that we really hold true to what we do with Bourbon Baroque and that’s of course the central component of collaboration. We are performing Georg Philipp Telemann’s La Putain.”

You can purchase your tickets to see Bourbon Baroque’s Dido and Aeneas here.

Metropolitan Opera: Wagner’s Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg

meistersinger

The Metropolitan Opera Saturday Matinee broadcasts are back on Classical 90.5. This week is Wagner’s epic comedy, back at the Met for the first time in eight years. James Morris and Michael Volle share the central role of Hans Sachs. Johan Botha reprises his indomitable Walther, and the elegant Annette Dasch is Eva.

Dolores Claiborne as an Opera

This Saturday we’ll broadcast Tobias Picker and J.D. McClatchy’s opera adaptation of Stephen King’s Dolores Claiborne from San Francisco Opera’s premiere production (get a preview below).

But first, watch Opera America’s “Creators in Concert,” with guest Tobias Picker, this evening at 7pm through their website.

Kentucky Opera

FIDELIO-synopsis-photo

Our Lunchtime Classics series returns in September. Until then, we’re featuring some artists who have performed on past episodes.

Kentucky Opera was founded in 1952 by Moritz von Bomhard. Its first productions were presented in the Columbia Auditorium until 1964 when they moved to the Brown Theatre. The company later moved some performances to Whitney Hall in the Kentucky Center for the Arts in 1984 and moved all productions there in 2000. Kentucky Opera currently presents most of its performances in the Brown Theatre.

Under Bomhard’s direction, Kentucky Opera grew to become a respected regional company. The Bomhard Theater at the Kentucky Center for the Arts is named in his honor. After 30 years of tenure, Bomhard retired in 1982.

Thomson Smillie became the company’s next General Director. A native of Glasgow, Scotland, Smillie had worked for the Scottish National Opera for twelve years in addition to being the Artistic Director of the Wexford Festival of Ireland. In the United States, Smillie led the Opera Company of Boston before coming to Louisville. Smillie served 16 seasons with Kentucky Opera before leaving in 1997.

In 1998, Deborah Sandler became the third General Director of Kentucky Opera. She came to Louisville from the Opera Festival of New Jersey where she had been on staff as Executive Director since 1985 and later as General Director. During her tenure at the Opera Festival of New Jersey, the company grew under her tenure to be a major national force in American Opera.

In January 2006, David Roth was announced as the new general director of Kentucky Opera, succeeding Ms. Sandler. Roth had been with Fort Worth Opera since 2000 where he balanced the artistic and fiscal responsibilities as both Director of Production and Director of Finance.

Kentucky Opera begins its 2014-2015 season with Fidelio by Ludwig van Beethoven in mid-September.

2014 Pulitzer Prize in Music Winners

Congratulations to the 2014 winner of the Pulitzer Prize in Music, John Luther Adams, for his orchestral work Become Ocean, premiered by the Seattle Symphony last June.

The finalists this year, two operas, are John Adams’ (not related) The Gospel According to the Other Mary and Christopher Cerrone’s Invisible Cities.