Steve Reich’s Radio Rewrite

Radio Rewrite

Composer Steve Reich drew concepts for his piece Radio Rewrite from Composer Perotin’s Proverb, composed in 1995. He also allowed Radiohead songs Jigsaw Falling into Place and Everything in Its Right Place influence the piece as well. This is the third track on his 2014 album titled after the piece itself, Radio Rewrite. The piece is in five movements, alternating in Reich’s typical fashion: Fast, Slow, Fast, Slow and Fast. Longtime friends of Reich ensemble Alarm Will Sound recorded this work under direction of Alan Pierson. The work calls for flute, clarinet, two vibraphones, two pianos, electric bass, and string quartet.

Electric Counterpoint and Piano Counterpoint are also featured on this album. Electric Counterpoint was composed in 1987 and originally performed and recorded by Pat Metheny. On this album it is recorded by Radiohead’s guitarist Jonny Greenwood. Reich heard Greenwood perform his work live and enjoyed the performance and then became interested in Radiohead’s music.

Piano Counterpoint is an arrangement of Reich’s Six Pianos by Vincent Corver in 2011. It is recorded by Pianist Vicky Chow. In this arrangement, four of the six piano voices are played as a recording while the performer plays the two remaining piano voices live.

You can purchase Reich’s Radio Rewrite on iTunes or Amazon.

Jinjoo Cho In-Studio

Jinjoo Cho.medium 2

Violinist Jinjoo Cho joined us in the Performance Studio of Classical 90.5 to perform a concert on February 3rd. Ms. Cho received the gold medal at the 2014 International Violin Competition of Indianapolis in September. The Gheens Great Expectations Program welcomed her and the administrator of the Gheens series pianist Jeff Jamner accompanied her. She gave an outstanding concert of “Grave and Fuga from Sonata No. 2 in A minor, BWV 1003″ by J.S. Bach, “Sonata in E Minor, K. 304″ by W.A. Mozart, and “Fantasy for Solo Violin” by Ellen Taaffe Zwilich. Daniel Gilliam hosted the concert, and spoke with Ms. Cho and Glen Kwok, Executive Director of ICVI.

Event: Classical Music Goes Pop!

bugs-bunny-in-whats-opera-doc-658x325

Classical music is around us more than you think! From TV commercials, to famous movie scenes, to sporting event entrance announcements, classical makes our free time more dramatic and exciting than any of us could ever expect. Join Classical 90.5’s Daniel Gilliam and Salon97′s Cariwyl Hebert for a fun and laid-back evening exploring some of the most famous uses of classical music in the popular culture universe. Atlantic No. 5 will provide food and beverages for purchase.

What: Classical Music Goes Pop! (part of IF University)
When: Tuesday, September 30, 2014 from 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM
Where: Atlantic No. 5, 605 W Main St., Louisville, KY 40202

Register for this FREE event here.

cariwylCariwyl Hebert is the founder of Salon97 (@salon97 on Twitter), a San Francisco-based non-profit making classical music fun and approachable for listeners across the U.S. and around the world. She is a two-time SXSW speaker and has presented events at venues across the country, including WQXR in New York, the San Francisco Public Library, and San Francisco’s de Young Museum. Because two lives are better than one, Cariwyl is also a web consultant specializing in social media and search engine marketing. More at salon97.org

 

daniel-gilliam1-150x150Daniel Gilliam is a composer (danielgilliam.com), and afternoon host and program director of Classical 90.5 WUOL (wuol.org). He’s currently working on new works for the Kentucky Center Chamber Players and violinist Rob Simonds. As a radio producer, Gilliam’s African American Voices won bronze in the 2014 New York Festivals International Radio Awards. Follow him on Twitter @danielgilliam.
if university

Lost Mozart Works Discovered

Mozart beim Komponieren / J.Bueche - Mozart Composing / Ptg. J.Bueche / c.1880 - Mozart composant / J. Bueche

Via Reiter’s News Service:

Twenty pieces of music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart have been discovered 220 years after he died.

The Vienna-based International Mozart Academy said yesterday that the compositions have been identified as works composed by Mozart in the year before his death. The works include 2 complete symphonies, a 28th piano concerto, a Masonic hymn, songs, and an opera based on the play The Stolen Kiss by Pierre Beaumarchais.

Mozart, who was born in Salzburg, lived from 1756 to 1791. He played the piano from an early age and began composing when he was five. He eventually created more than 600 works, including operas, chamber music, orchestral works and choral pieces.

You can listen to the finale to the Piano Concerto No. 28 in A major here.

Women’s History Month – Clara Schumann

clara-schumann-1819-1896-granger

Clara Josephine Wieck was born in Leipzig on 13 September 1819. Her father taught her music theory and performance in a rigorous schedule at an early age. She performed publicly as a young girl and met another young musician, Robert Schumann, when she performed at a home at the age of eight. Schumann moved into the Wieck house as a student of Clara’s father. Ten years later, Clara and Schumann married.

Clara was giving solo piano recitals in a European tour when she was eleven. She continued to perform to rave reviews after her marriage. She was praised by Frederick Chopin and Franz Liszt. She and Robert formed a close friendship to the young Johannes Brahms and she championed his music.

Although she composed many mature compositions, Clara Schumann’s legacy lies mostly in her career as a pianist. She was one of the first performers to perform works from memory in public, a practice that has been used ever since. Edvard Grieg called Clara “one of the most soulful and famous pianists of the day”. She performed her piano concerto at the age of sixteen in Leipzig with Felix Mendelssohn conducting.

Clara Schumann was responsible for raising not only her children but some of her grandchildren as well. She showed great courage when, at the age of 29, she walked through the streets of Dresden during the May Uprising to rescue her children. Although confronted by a group of armed men, she retrieved her children and escorted them back home to safety.

Enjoy this romanticized reenactment of Clara Schumann from the film “Song of Love” in which Clara (Katharine Hepburn) schools Franz Liszt on the art of simplicity.