Lunchtime Classics: Kentucky Opera Presents Fidelio

Fidelio set

Kentucky Opera opens their 2014-2015 season with Beethoven’s Fidelio, and you can get an up-close preview on Lunchtime Classics, September 3rd at noon. Call (502) 814-6565 to reserve a lunch from City Cafe and a front row seat. Space will fill up quickly!

Until then, check out this cover for an LP set of Fidelio conducted by Zubin Mehta
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Kentucky Opera

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Our Lunchtime Classics series returns in September. Until then, we’re featuring some artists who have performed on past episodes.

Kentucky Opera was founded in 1952 by Moritz von Bomhard. Its first productions were presented in the Columbia Auditorium until 1964 when they moved to the Brown Theatre. The company later moved some performances to Whitney Hall in the Kentucky Center for the Arts in 1984 and moved all productions there in 2000. Kentucky Opera currently presents most of its performances in the Brown Theatre.

Under Bomhard’s direction, Kentucky Opera grew to become a respected regional company. The Bomhard Theater at the Kentucky Center for the Arts is named in his honor. After 30 years of tenure, Bomhard retired in 1982.

Thomson Smillie became the company’s next General Director. A native of Glasgow, Scotland, Smillie had worked for the Scottish National Opera for twelve years in addition to being the Artistic Director of the Wexford Festival of Ireland. In the United States, Smillie led the Opera Company of Boston before coming to Louisville. Smillie served 16 seasons with Kentucky Opera before leaving in 1997.

In 1998, Deborah Sandler became the third General Director of Kentucky Opera. She came to Louisville from the Opera Festival of New Jersey where she had been on staff as Executive Director since 1985 and later as General Director. During her tenure at the Opera Festival of New Jersey, the company grew under her tenure to be a major national force in American Opera.

In January 2006, David Roth was announced as the new general director of Kentucky Opera, succeeding Ms. Sandler. Roth had been with Fort Worth Opera since 2000 where he balanced the artistic and fiscal responsibilities as both Director of Production and Director of Finance.

Kentucky Opera begins its 2014-2015 season with Fidelio by Ludwig van Beethoven in mid-September.

Kentucky Center Stage: Louisville Orchestra Finale

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Don’t miss the last Louisville Orchestra broadcast of the season with Jorge Mester conducting Beethoven’s first and last symphonies, recorded in Whitney Hall with soloists Katie van Kooten, Rebekah Bortz Hardin, Daniel Weeks, Kenneth Shaw and the chorus which included singers from University of Louisville Cardinal Singers and Collegiate Chorale, Voces Novae and Louisville Chamber Choir.

And listen to this interesting segment from Radiolab on Beethoven and the metronome.

Beethoven’s Ninth

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Last week I recommended a “historically-informed performance” (HIP) recording of Beethoven’s 9th symphony. Now it’s time to look at the “traditional” performances of the opus that are available.

To pick one recording out of the hundreds that are available as the greatest would be an act of folly, as any choice as “the definitive” performance would raise the hackles of almost everyone else who has an opinion on the matter. So please allow me to offer two recommendations from different eras from the history of recordings.

Herbert von Karajan recorded the entire symphonic cycle of Beethoven four (yes, 4!) times. It is generally accepted that the 1963 recordings are his best. Karajan uses spirited tempi where appropriate. Fine soloists shine in the finale of the Ninth.

Claudio Abbado’s 2000 recording with the Berlin Philharmonic stands out among others in its boxed set of the complete symphonies. Abbado had the unenviable task of taking over the reigns of the Berlin Philharmonic after decades of leadership from Karajan. But he led the group admirably during his short tenure. The Berlin musicians play sharper than before and Abbado leads them in fresh interpretations of the works.

Beethoven’s Ninth

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With the Louisville Orchestra’s performances of Ludwig van Beethoven’s “Choral” Symphony coming soon, I thought I would recommend a couple of recordings of the work. In the historically informed performance (HIP) category, I would recommend the EMI recording of the London Classical Players as conducted by Roger Norrington. Norrington’s group seems to capture the best aspects of HIP which includes the raw power of the original instruments and the faster tempi of the movements.

When the EMI Norrington recordings first were issued they were scorned by some critics and hailed as a revelation by many listeners. Much of the ire was aimed at the tempi, according to Norrington:

“The speed of the music was a particular problem. Beethoven had carefully given a metronome mark to every movement and every change of tempo in his symphonies. But almost every conductor ignored these speeds and performed the music much more slowly and ‘grandly’.”

The Romantic movement saw orchestras getting larger. At the same time, Beethoven’s shadow cast over music history like a titan. The orchestras lead by Gustav Mahler, Leopold Stowkoski and others performed Beethoven’s opuses with a sense of reverence. The larger group of musicians required slower tempi to accommodate the bigger number of instruments.

With the smaller historically-informed groups, performances of Beethoven’s symphonies became lithe, more supple works. The original tempo markings by Beethoven seem to suddenly make sense with the smaller ensembles.

Next week I’ll recommend a “traditional” performance of the work. In the meantime, enjoy this excerpt of Roger Norrington’s interpretation of the second movement with the London Classical Players: