Violinist’s New Bach Recording is a Stunner

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Georgian violinist Lisa Batiashvili has released a new album with the music of J.S. and C.P.E. Bach on Deutsche Grammophon. The program consists mostly of Johann Sebastian with a Trio Sonata by Carl Philipp Emanuel.

Elizabeth Batiashvili was born in Tbilisi, Georgia. Her father was a violinist and her mother a pianist. Before she turned three Batiashvili was playing a miniature violin. From age eight, she studied music at a Tbilisi music school for gifted children.

When her family moved to Munich, Germany, Batiashvili studied music at the Hamburg Musikhochschule and the Munich Musikhochschule. At 16, Batiashvili captured second prize at the Helsinki-based Sibelius Competition. In 1999-2001 she was a BBC New Generation Artist, debuting at the 2000 BBC Proms.

Since then, Batiashvili has been touring all over the world and recording highly-praised performances. Her new Bach album was recorded with the Bavarian Radio Chamber Symphony Orchestra.

Dolores Claiborne as an Opera

This Saturday we’ll broadcast Tobias Picker and J.D. McClatchy’s opera adaptation of Stephen King’s Dolores Claiborne from San Francisco Opera’s premiere production (get a preview below).

But first, watch Opera America’s “Creators in Concert,” with guest Tobias Picker, this evening at 7pm through their website.

Ryan Gardner and Louisa Woodson Play Debussy

Recorded live at Lunchtime Classics on September 17, 2014. Ryan Gardner and Louisa Woodson gave a concert that included this set of Debussy songs.

Video: Kevin Cole Plays Gershwin

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Hear Kevin Cole’s performance on Lunchtime Classics and short video from the program.

Beethoven’s Fidelio

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As Kentucky Opera prepares its production of Ludwig van Beethoven’s sole opera Fidelio, let’s look back at the work’s popularity through the years.

When Beethoven’s Fidelio premiered on November 20, 1805, the house was half full. The performance was deemed a failure. The production was repeated twice and then dropped. The work returned to the stage in March of the following year after Beethoven make some cuts and other changes. It failed again. Fidelio was tried once again the next season, but attracted only the cognoscenti of the buying public. Angry with his creation, Beethoven withdrew the work and completely revised it in 1814.

Thirteen years later, Beethoven presented the manuscript to his close friend and biographer, Anton Schindler. Near death, Beethoven reportedly said, “Of all my children, this is the one that cost me the worst birth-pangs and brought me the most sorrow; and for that reason it is the one most dear to me.”

Fidelio is much loved in today’s opera world and holds an honored place in the repertoire. It’s also well represented on Compact Disc recordings. However, since the mid 20th century the work is revived only sporadically due its lack of box office success. Perhaps due to its inconsistent style: the first scene is largely Singspiel, or light opera. Or it could be the naivete of the plot which contrasts with the fiery emotional pull of the music.

Enjoy this moment when Fidelio allows the prisoners to experience the sunlight.