Showing the Love with Music Makes a City

music makes a city

If you love WUOL, you probably love the Louisville Orchestra as well. As part of our membership drive, we’re offering the homegrown documentary Music Makes a City, the story of the founding and subsequent fame of the Louisville Orchestra, as a thank you gift.

Music Makes a City begins with the story of the great Ohio River Flood of 1937 and the founding of the Louisville Orchestra as part of the effort to rebuild the city after the disaster.  It then recounts the hard work and dedication of the young conductor Robert Whitney and Louisville mayor Charles Farnsley to keep the orchestra afloat, and the mayor’s bright idea to make the Louisville Orchestra into a cultural icon by commissioning new works by contemporary composers. This scheme brought the Louisville Orchestra into an international spotlight, with a performance in New York’s Carnegie Hall and a visit by a group of Soviet composers including Shostakovich.

In light of the Louisville Orchestra’s recent trouble, rebirth, and seemingly bright future with the leadership of Teddy Abrams and Andrew Kipe, Music Makes a City is an important reminder of the truly remarkable history of the institution. The film includes musical excerpts from the Louisville Orchestra’s First Edition recordings, and the special features disc is chock-full of interviews with composers like Ned Rorem and Elliott Carter, who had works premiered here by the Orchestra, and with members of the community who experienced much of the history first hand. Hearing these full interviews, where great American composers give their opinion of Louisville while Louisvillians give their opinions of the composers, are interesting in themselves, even taken out of the context of the documentary.

Hear directors Owsley Brown III and Jerome Hiler talk talk about some of this unique history and how it unfolds in their documentary.

We are currently offering Music Makes a City as a gift for members who pledge $15 a month or more.

Bourbon Baroque & Les Sauvages

Louisville’s Bourbon Baroque and the Squallis Puppeteers are presenting a unique version of Rameau’s “Les Sauvages.” Alan Brandt talked to Bourbon Baroque’s John Austin Clark and Nico Fortin about the trials and triumphs of this collaboration.

Bellatrix Music Part II: Clara Schumann

Bellatrix Musica is a four-part series about the influence of women throughout music history. Part two focuses on female musicians of the 19th century, particularly Clara Schumann and Fanny Hensel.

Music:

“February” from The YearFanny Mendelssohn-Hensel, performed by Liana Serbescu, Fanny Mendelssohn-Hensel Klavierwerke Vol I, CPO 999013

Liebeszauber, Clara Schumann, sung by Lauralyn Kolb with pianist Con Mcmahon, Songs by Clara Schumann, Poldowski, and Amy Beach, Albany TROY109-2

“September” from The Year Fanny Mendelssohn-Hensel, performed by Liana Serbescu, Fanny Mendelssohn-Hensel Klavierwerke Vol I, CPO 999013

Der Mond Kommt Still Gegangen, Clara Schumann, sung by Lauralyn Kolb with pianist Con Mcmahon, Songs by Clara Schumann, Poldowski, and Amy Beach, Albany TROY109-2

Piano Trio in G minor, Op. 17, Clara Schumann, performed by Micaela Gelius, Sreten Krstic, and Stephan Hack, Clara Schuman: Piano and Chamber Music, Arte Nova 721060

Romance No. 3 for violin and piano, Op. 22, Clara Schumann, performed by Micaela Gelius, Sreten Krstic, and Stephan Hack, Clara Schuman: Piano and Chamber Music, Arte Nova 721060

Spring Membership Drive: Music Makes a City Premium

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During this Spring Membership Drive only, you can receive a copy of the DVD Music Makes a City with your sustaining contribution of $15/month or more ($180/year). Click here or call (502) 814-6565 to find out how.

Women’s History Month – Madeleine Dring

madeleine-dring

An English actress, musician and composer, Madeleine Dring is little known to American audiences. Her compositions are light and eminently approachable. Born in 1923 into a musical family, Dring displayed her musical talent early. Taught at the Royal College of Music, her instructors included Ralph Vaughan Williams, Herbert Howells, and Gordon Jacob. At the same time Dring studied mime and drama.

Dring’s acting career seems to have been for the stage only, as her only credit for TV or movies is as composer for an animated TV show called Little Laura. Many of her stage appearances included her performing her own compositions.

As a composer Madeleine Dring specialized in smaller-scale compositions such as songs, solo piano and chamber works. Her Trio for flute, oboe and piano is one of her most-performed works today.

Please enjoy this performance of the Three Piece Suite for Oboe and Piano by Madeleine Dring: